Chances for Drug Reform Under A Democratic Congress


Don’t expect Congress to create Hamsterdam like in Season 3 of The Wire but the chances of drug reform are a lot more promising. Philip Smith writes on StopTheDrugWar’s blog:

While there is optimism in drug reform circles, it is tempered by a healthy dose of realism. The Congress is a place where it is notoriously difficult to make (or unmake) a law, and while some of the new Democratic leadership has made sympathetic noises on certain issues, drug reform is not exactly a high-profile issue. Whether congressional Democratic decision-makers will decide to use their political resources advancing an agenda that could be attacked as “soft on drugs” or “soft on crime” remains to be seen. But according to one of the movement’s most astute Hill-watchers, some “low-hanging fruit” might be within reach next year.

“Some of the easiest things to achieve in the new Congress will be the HEA ban on aid to students with drug violations, because the Democrats will have to deal with HEA reauthorization, and the ban on access to the TANF (Temporary Aid to Needy Families) to public housing, because they will have to deal with welfare reform,” said Bill Piper, director of government relations *** for the Drug Policy Alliance. “There is also a chance of repealing provisions in the DC appropriations bill that bar needle exchanges and medical marijuana. These are the low-hanging fruit.”

For Piper, there is also a chance to see movement on a second tier of issues, including medical marijuana, sentencing reform and Latin America policy. “Can we get the votes to pass Hinchey-Rohrabacher in the House and get it to the Senate?” he asked. “There is also a good chance of completely changing how we deal with Latin America. We could see a shift in funding from military to civil society-type programs and from eradication to crop substitution,” he said. “Also, there is a good chance on sentencing reform. Can the Democrats strike a deal with Sen. Sessions (R-AL) and other Republicans on the crack-powder disparity, or will they try to play politics and paint the Democrats as soft on crime? Would Bush veto it if it passed?”

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